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Chicken broth is traditionally a favourite food. Whether you like the broth or not, chicken soup is a remarkable liquid and it has been used for generations among the sick.
Yes, we recommend chicken broth for arthritics. It has the right type of oils and vitamins.
When eating a drumstick of a chicken, have you ever taken time to notice the gristle and the lining adjacent to the joint? Next time, look closely. If the gristly cartilage is a golden yellow, the chicken’s diet has been substantially good. When the yellow or colourless gristle (cartilage) is not present at all, that chicken has had arthritis!

Chickens have Arthritis, too
Whether fowl, capon, roaster, fryer or boiler, barnyard creatures can eat their way into arthritis. The farmer can tell when a chicken has joint ailments. He looks at the fowl, and can see their legs swell and the way they limp. We may well wonder why chickens get this disease. Is their diet wrong?
For the most part, chickens eat corn or mash. Corn contains traces of vitamin D in its oil. The oil is there, but like human beings, chickens do not always properly assimilate what is in their food.
Like people, chickens make the mistake of drinking water with their meals—thus disqualifying the essential vitamins. The chicken (or person) who tries to mix oil and water violates one of the oldest rules of chemistry.
When chickens drink water with their corn or mash, the dietary oil turns from lubricating oils into surplus fat. Excess deposits of oil are then found under the skin, or wherever tissue will store it. The result: an arthritic chicken.
When it comes time for you to cook a chicken, watch out for these faulty deposits of fat in the bird. They will not serve your arthritic body, they’ll just fatten you.
Trim away any chicken fat under the skin or in the body cavity of the fowl. If you do not remove this fat before making soup, then skim it off the soup dish.
The only oil worth consuming from the chicken is found in the normal gristled drumstick. There 1 not enough of vitamin D in a single drumstick with a healthy lining to be of really major help. Bat the healthiest chicken broth is made from these drumsticks and the giblets. It is just as easy to make chicken broth from a pound of drumsticks as it is to cook the whole chicken.
If you take time to serve chicken broth, do NOT be tempted to serve it in the following forms:
Chicken soup with rice.
Chicken soup with noodles.
Chicken soup with dumplings.
Remember, rice, noodles and dumplings make the soup starchy . . . the wrong kind of starch. And arthritics must abstain from such carbohydrates if they want to become well and stay well. Brown rice or whole grains are superior to the polished variety, and they may be added in small quantities if you feel that you must have something in your soup.
Again, let us examine the case of a farmer with his chickens—to draw some interesting comparisons for human arthritics. On progressive farms today, many ranchers take steps to give their flocks of chickens a balanced diet. In addition to corn and mash, the fowl are provided with carotene (supplemented carrot oil). Also, they receive some kind of fish-liver oil, combined with their food. This helps the chickens to further productivity and prevents rickets.
With humans, we know that liver oil from the codfish is used successfully to help prevent rickets in children. Fish-liver oil and carotene contain vitamins A and D—and often also have the fertility promoting vitamin E.
The A, D and E vitamins mentioned, in their natural state, exist as oil soluble vitamins. Each vitamin has a job to do and a specific place to go. Vitamin A, as we know, is valuable to the eyes and their linings. Vitamin D, as used against rickets, is of great aid to the minerals for bone and joint formation.
Vitamin E is recommended for fertility. It is found in supplemented carotene. So, when a chicken gets its sustaining food with supplemental vitaminised oil for a few months, there is a very noticeable difference in its appearance. The joints grow straight, with no swelling. The feathers have lustre, the skin is elastic and normal. The eyes are good and the nails of their feet are firm. All this, because oil has been added to the diet!
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The doctors and medical experts mentioned above are only a few of the outstanding rheumatologists to whom we owe a vote of thanks. Hundreds of professional men like them also believe that research on cartilage will help solve the “wear and tear” phase of arthritis. This book maintains that we already have a way to aid the cartilage: through proper diet.
To prevent loss of elasticity in cartilage—and to overcome dryness in the linings of the joints-certain dietary oils must be brought into our system with every meal. (The specific oils we need to do this lubricating job are named and discussed in later chapters of this book.)
We have just been reading a great deal about cartilage and how to keep it from “drying out.” We have used cartilage as the main example because it particularly applies to people with osteo-arthritis— and osteo-arthritis encompasses the largest number of cases in America.
May we emphasise, however, that a similar “drying” process also occurs among victims of rheumatoid arthritis. In their case, all the dietary facts in this book still apply. If you have rheumatoid arthritis, the dryness starts in your joint linings In lead of in the cartilage. Your “oiling” problem therefore somewhat easier to solve. Why?
Because the inner structure of the joint lining does have blood vessels and lymphatic channels. Linings can take oil and nourishment directly, while the cartilage cannot. As long as your diet keeps the right nourishment coming in, the joint lining can send oils to the joint cavity. From there, some iodised oil will travel on even farther and reach your cartilage through osmosis.
So, as you can see, everything we have been discussing applies to rheumatoid arthritis, too.
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